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William Tyler Posters: In Process

18 Jul 2013

William Tyler posters, in process, by Daniella Ben-Bassat

William Tyler posters, in process, by Daniella Ben-Bassat

We’re gearing up for the William Tyler show on August 6 (did we mention that $3.33 will be opening?), and got a sneak peek at the posters, designed by artist Daniella Ben-Bassat, which are due to arrive next week. They are printed on DENIM. We emailed Daniella about her inspiration for the design:

I really like being able to manipulate whatever I’m going to print on and was feeling a little bit limited by paper. Denim has always been very cool to me and can symbolize a lot of different things and aesthetics — Americana, folk, punk, whatever. I was also looking at some of the shapes from the Gee’s Bend quilts and started messing with those. The blocky patterns reminded me of the Black Flag logo, so I started incorporating that font into the design. It’s always exciting to me when different periods of creative culture and history speak similar visual languages.

And she ps’d us with another influence.

So good. People are cool. We’re lucky to work with artists in all phases of our shows: poster, performance, photography. Triple threat. Check out Daniella’s inspirations for the poster below.

Annie Mae Young, born 1928. "Bars," ca. 1965. Corduroy, denim, polyester knit, assorted synthetics, 81 x 79. q026-03.jpg

A quilt of Gee’s Bend. Annie Mae Young, born 1928. “Bars,” ca. 1965. Corduroy, denim, polyester knit, assorted synthetics, 81 x 79. Courtesy of Auburn University.

Mary Lee Bendolph, born 1935. "Housetop" variation, 1998; quilted by her daughter, Essie bendolph Pettway, in 2001, cotton, corduroy, twill, assorted polyesters, 72 x 76 inches. In the early 1990s, a former Bend resident living in Bridgeport, Connecticut, sent some garments -- double-knit leisure suits -- to Gee's Bend. Mary Lee Bendolph remembers: "My sister-in-law's daughter sent those clothes down here and told me to give them away, but didn't nobody want them. That knit stuff, clothes from way back yonder, don't nobody wear no more, and the pants was all bell- bottom. We ain't that out-of-style down here. I was going to take them to the Salvation Army but didn't have no way to get there, so I just made quilts out of them." q030-06.jpg

A quilt of Gee’s Bend. Mary Lee Bendolph, born 1935. “Housetop” variation, 1998; quilted by her daughter, Essie bendolph Pettway, in 2001, cotton, corduroy, twill, assorted polyesters, 72 x 76 inches. Courtesy of Auburn University.

Black Flag logo

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